time waits for no one
Kara. SoCal. Ravenclaw. Singer. Lolita. Feminist. Queer. She/Her/Hers

I like sweet, cute, colorful things~ Let's be friends!

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omg we passed a gaggle of guys on the street (they were maybe early to mid twenties?) and as they walked by they said, in unison, “heyyy” and then when we said “hi” back, they all said “what’s uppppp” in like the most friendly, sing-song manner omg my life has been made

high resolution →

(Source: samehat)

I’m not really interested in most media anymore… Can anyone suggest anything to me that isn’t cisheteronormative, has good queer/poc/religious minority/altfashion/altlifestyle/etc representation, and/or especially has good examples of all kinds of close relationships including platonic ones? 

I know I’m kind of asking for a miracle here but I’m sure there are some that must exist, and I’d like to give them support along with just wanting to see them for myself.

Maybe we can get a list going here to share! I know lots of you will be interested as well!

betterbemeta:

Robots first seeing or hearing of human body shaming and ableism and being confused and concerned

isn’t it the whole point to have varying forms and function? Why would every being be built to accomplish the same tasks in the same manner? Why would you set your system up such that some units cannot navigate it?

Why do humans think nearly their whole production series, including themselves, is defective?

So my question is what is actual masculinity and what is just the patriarchy?

Seriously though. Many things considered feminine today weren’t always… They were just things humans did. So where exactly does genderqueer blend over into feminine/masculine?

Yeah no shit. Tickling is not funny or nice. >:[

Yeah no shit. Tickling is not funny or nice. >:[

(Source: viralfacts)

The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are full of doubts while the stupid ones are full of confidence.

Charles Bukowski  (via vodkaknowsmebest)

(Source: breakfromlife777)

baracudaboy:


Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:
Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.
The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”
The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.

These are my favorite kind of stories.

baracudaboy:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.

The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”

The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.

These are my favorite kind of stories.

thedailywhat:

Makeshift Convenience of the Day: With a few plastic crates, some cardboard, a small table, and the assistance of friends and family, 7-Eleven store owner Takashi Watanabe was able to re-open for business in the heart of hard-hit Miyagi prefecture two months after his establishment was destroyed by the earthquake and washed away by the subsequent tsunami.
[asahi [jp] / @mulboyne / superpunch.]

thedailywhat:

Makeshift Convenience of the Day: With a few plastic crates, some cardboard, a small table, and the assistance of friends and family, 7-Eleven store owner Takashi Watanabe was able to re-open for business in the heart of hard-hit Miyagi prefecture two months after his establishment was destroyed by the earthquake and washed away by the subsequent tsunami.

[asahi [jp] / @mulboyne / superpunch.]

lickystickypickyme:


At the heart of this collection of portraits is my desire to remind us  that we were all equal, until our environment, circumstances or fate  molded and weathered us into whom we have become. 

Los Angeles- and New  York-based photographer Mark Laita completed Created Equal over the  course of eight years; his poignant words reflect the striking  polarizations found in his photographs. Presented as diptychs, the  images explore social, economic and gender difference and similarity  within the United States, emulating and updating the portraiture of  Edward Curtis, August Sander and Richard Avedon.
high resolution →

lickystickypickyme:

At the heart of this collection of portraits is my desire to remind us that we were all equal, until our environment, circumstances or fate molded and weathered us into whom we have become.

Los Angeles- and New York-based photographer Mark Laita completed Created Equal over the course of eight years; his poignant words reflect the striking polarizations found in his photographs. Presented as diptychs, the images explore social, economic and gender difference and similarity within the United States, emulating and updating the portraiture of Edward Curtis, August Sander and Richard Avedon.