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thepeoplesrecord:

Occupy Wall Street in Times Square today.
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thepeoplesrecord:

Occupy Wall Street in Times Square today.

There have now been at least 7,106 arrests in 114 cities across the United States since the Occupy movement began on Sept. 17, 2011.

thepeoplesrecord:


WhatthefuckhasOccupydone.com

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fromthenovel:

D17 Police Violence - 7th Ave and 34th St - Occupy Wall St

(by sneeekos)

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stfuconservatives:

chrstndvtt:

feurety:

sanityscraps:

inothernews:

From the New York Daily News:

At the corner of Maiden and Water Streets I spoke to a National Lawyer’s  Guild observer who said she watched a video of a police motorcycle run  over another Lawyer’s Guild observer’s leg and then saw with her own  eyes that man get pushed to the ground by police, be arrested and get  thrown into a police van. “He’s a legal observer with the  National Lawyer’s Guild, he was observing the protest and he was run  over by a police motorcycle,” said Zainab Akbar, 31.Akbar said  she watched the entire thing on the video camera of a protester and then  watched with her own eyes the end of the incident, with the observer,  whom she could only identify as ‘Ari,’ being arrested and put into the  back of a police van.“His leg was stuck under the bike and he  kicked his leg to get the bike off his leg and then the police attacked  him and shoved him into the ground and put a night stick against the  back of his neck,” Akbar said.

This photo was taken by Joe Marino for the Daily News.  He’s one of the photographers seen in this photo allegedly just standing there, taking pictures, instead of helping.  
Now y’all know why.
Furthermore, 1010 WINS reporter Steve Sandberg (sorry, no link) has natsound of the incident, with the man, pinned under the motorcycle, screaming, in excruciating pain.

Words. There are none. I am disgusted.

I’m disgusted at the cop who ran this gentleman over but I’m even more disgusted at the people in the background standing there, some obviously taking photos, not making a move to help this man up. 5 people, including the person who took this photo, just stood there. Taking a photo was more important to them than helping a fellow human being. What’s wrong with that picture?

Here’s video of the incident. Notice at 0:20 an officer beating someone (the victim?) with their nightstick.

You can see in the video that people are actually trying to help him (yes taking pictures at the same time, it’s kind of worth recording) but the police are shoving them away. Disgusting, especially since it seems that this is not a singular occurrence.
Is running people over the latest NYPD strategy?
-Joe
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stfuconservatives:

chrstndvtt:

feurety:

sanityscraps:

inothernews:

From the New York Daily News:

At the corner of Maiden and Water Streets I spoke to a National Lawyer’s Guild observer who said she watched a video of a police motorcycle run over another Lawyer’s Guild observer’s leg and then saw with her own eyes that man get pushed to the ground by police, be arrested and get thrown into a police van.

“He’s a legal observer with the National Lawyer’s Guild, he was observing the protest and he was run over by a police motorcycle,” said Zainab Akbar, 31.

Akbar said she watched the entire thing on the video camera of a protester and then watched with her own eyes the end of the incident, with the observer, whom she could only identify as ‘Ari,’ being arrested and put into the back of a police van.

“His leg was stuck under the bike and he kicked his leg to get the bike off his leg and then the police attacked him and shoved him into the ground and put a night stick against the back of his neck,” Akbar said.

This photo was taken by Joe Marino for the Daily News.  He’s one of the photographers seen in this photo allegedly just standing there, taking pictures, instead of helping. 

Now y’all know why.

Furthermore, 1010 WINS reporter Steve Sandberg (sorry, no link) has natsound of the incident, with the man, pinned under the motorcycle, screaming, in excruciating pain.

Words. There are none. I am disgusted.

I’m disgusted at the cop who ran this gentleman over but I’m even more disgusted at the people in the background standing there, some obviously taking photos, not making a move to help this man up. 5 people, including the person who took this photo, just stood there. Taking a photo was more important to them than helping a fellow human being. What’s wrong with that picture?

Here’s video of the incident. Notice at 0:20 an officer beating someone (the victim?) with their nightstick.

You can see in the video that people are actually trying to help him (yes taking pictures at the same time, it’s kind of worth recording) but the police are shoving them away. Disgusting, especially since it seems that this is not a singular occurrence.

Is running people over the latest NYPD strategy?

-Joe

Newsweek: "Dear Occupy Wall Street Protesters"

Stay leaderless and anonymous. It appeared at first that not having a leader, a single face people could relate to, would be your fatal flaw. Now it seems to be the mark of your collective genius. The media would pounce on a leader, or leaders, and reduce your entire movement to a life story, a…

think-progress:

TIME picks Occupy Wall Street as the top U.S. news story of the year.
And the OWS story isn’t even over yet.

think-progress:

TIME picks Occupy Wall Street as the top U.S. news story of the year.

And the OWS story isn’t even over yet.

(Source: dailykos.com)

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thedailywhat:

Occupy Melbourne News Update of the Day: Though Occupy protesters in Melbourne were able to successfully skirt the city’s anti-Occupy ban on camping by wearing their tents, the clever subterfuge was short-lived.

This morning, police told protesters they could no longer walk around Flagstaff Gardens dressed as tents, and would be given “reasonable time” to put on clothes before police would be forced to take action.

In recently uploaded video (above), officers can be seen tearing apart one protester’s tent-garment, leaving the woman — identified only as “Sarah” — with only her underclothes.

Police said three “Tent Monsters” co-operated, but Sarah “refused to comply with direction.” The 20-year-old was reportedly feeling “extremely distressed” following the incident, and has filed a complaint with the Victoria Police Ethical Standards Department.

“The Ethical Standards Department has subsequently received a physical assault complaint in relation to this incident and is investigating,” a police spokesperson said in a statement. “As this investigation is ongoing we will not be commenting further.”

[heraldsun / blogpost.]

thedailywhat:

Occupy Movement News Update of the Day: Just under 350 people were arrested in twin raids on Occupy encampments last night.
In Los Angeles, more than 1,400 LAPD officers dismantled the Occupy LA encampment that had been set up on the south lawn of Los Angeles City Hall since early October.
Some 290 people who refused police orders to evacuate were arrested.

A few protesters reported seeing scuffles, but National Lawyers Guild observer Pam Noles praised police officers, saying “the LAPD had their A game on.” She also commended the protesters “who stood on message, stood on discipline and stood on faith,” concluding that “[b]oth sides did what they had to do.”
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa also had kind words for his police department. “I said that here in L.A. we’d chart a different path, and we did,” Villaraigosa told reporters as he toured the messy grounds.
Fences and concrete barriers were erected around City Hall, and it was unclear when protesters would be allowed back in to collect their belongings.
Several dozen Occupy protesters with nowhere else to go sought sanctuary at the nearby Our Lady Queen of Angels Church. “I hope it evolves in another direction because I don’t think the police are going to let us continue a physical occupation,” said protester Brendan Hainer.
A General Assembly meeting is still scheduled to take place today at Pershing Square. The City Hall’s “free-speech zone” will also remain open. A general strike at the Port of Los Angeles remains on the docket for December 12th.
Meanwhile, in Philadelphia, a much calmer scene, as police entered the Occupy encampment near City Hall following an eviction notice that elapsed two days ago. 52 people were arrested after “a chaotic night of cat-and-mouse,” with police stalking protesters around the City Center from Dilworth Plaza to 15th Street.
The most significant clash occurred around 5 AM behind the Inquirer building. Both sides sustained a few minor injuries. Several streets remain closed, and Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey said officers will stay at Dilworth Plaza as long as necessary.
Related: Iraq war vet Scott Olsen, who was critically wounded during the Occupy Oakland raid, spoke on camera for the first time since the incident after returning to the scene of the now-dismantled Occupy Oakland encampment.
[latimes / philly / cnn / usatoday / photo: latimes.]
high resolution →

thedailywhat:

Occupy Movement News Update of the Day: Just under 350 people were arrested in twin raids on Occupy encampments last night.

In Los Angeles, more than 1,400 LAPD officers dismantled the Occupy LA encampment that had been set up on the south lawn of Los Angeles City Hall since early October.

Some 290 people who refused police orders to evacuate were arrested.

A few protesters reported seeing scuffles, but National Lawyers Guild observer Pam Noles praised police officers, saying “the LAPD had their A game on.” She also commended the protesters “who stood on message, stood on discipline and stood on faith,” concluding that “[b]oth sides did what they had to do.”

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa also had kind words for his police department. “I said that here in L.A. we’d chart a different path, and we did,” Villaraigosa told reporters as he toured the messy grounds.

Fences and concrete barriers were erected around City Hall, and it was unclear when protesters would be allowed back in to collect their belongings.

Several dozen Occupy protesters with nowhere else to go sought sanctuary at the nearby Our Lady Queen of Angels Church. “I hope it evolves in another direction because I don’t think the police are going to let us continue a physical occupation,” said protester Brendan Hainer.

A General Assembly meeting is still scheduled to take place today at Pershing Square. The City Hall’s “free-speech zone” will also remain open. A general strike at the Port of Los Angeles remains on the docket for December 12th.

Meanwhile, in Philadelphia, a much calmer scene, as police entered the Occupy encampment near City Hall following an eviction notice that elapsed two days ago. 52 people were arrested after “a chaotic night of cat-and-mouse,” with police stalking protesters around the City Center from Dilworth Plaza to 15th Street.

The most significant clash occurred around 5 AM behind the Inquirer building. Both sides sustained a few minor injuries. Several streets remain closed, and Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey said officers will stay at Dilworth Plaza as long as necessary.

Related: Iraq war vet Scott Olsen, who was critically wounded during the Occupy Oakland raid, spoke on camera for the first time since the incident after returning to the scene of the now-dismantled Occupy Oakland encampment.

[latimes / philly / cnnusatoday / photo: latimes.]